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Apple Store, Shopping

Shopping inside Apple Store in New York United States America – FEB 23 2016: New Apple products , iPad Pro displayed for use in New York, USA

iPad, Apple Store

iPad in an Apple Computer Store

Apple Store, Shopping

Shopping inside Apple Store in New York, UNITED STATES AMERICA – FEB 23 2016: New Apple products , iPad Pro displayed on wooden tables for use in New York, USA

Caesar salad

The salad’s creation is generally attributed to restaurateur Caesar Cardini, an Italian immigrant who operated restaurants in Mexico and the United States. Cardini was living in San Diego but also working in Tijuana where he avoided the restrictions of Prohibition.His daughter Rosa (1928–2003) recounted that her father invented the dish when a Fourth of July 1924 rush depleted the kitchen’s supplies. Cardini made do with what he had, adding the dramatic flair of the table-side tossing “by the chef.” A number of Cardini’s staff have said that they invented the dish.

Julia Child said that she had eaten a Caesar salad at Cardini’s restaurant when she was a child in the 1920s. The earliest contemporary documentation of Caesar Salad is from a 1946 Los Angeles restaurant menu, twenty-two years after the 1924 origin stated by the Cardinis.

Caesar salad

The salad’s creation is generally attributed to restaurateur Caesar Cardini, an Italian immigrant who operated restaurants in Mexico and the United States. Cardini was living in San Diego but also working in Tijuana where he avoided the restrictions of Prohibition.His daughter Rosa (1928–2003) recounted that her father invented the dish when a Fourth of July 1924 rush depleted the kitchen’s supplies. Cardini made do with what he had, adding the dramatic flair of the table-side tossing “by the chef.” A number of Cardini’s staff have said that they invented the dish.

Julia Child said that she had eaten a Caesar salad at Cardini’s restaurant when she was a child in the 1920s. The earliest contemporary documentation of Caesar Salad is from a 1946 Los Angeles restaurant menu, twenty-two years after the 1924 origin stated by the Cardinis.

Classic Cappuccino

The consumption of coffee in Europe was initially based on the traditional Ottoman preparation of the drink, by bringing to boil the mixture of coffee and water together, sometimes by adding sugar. The British seem to have started filtering and steeping coffee already in the 2nd part of the 17th century and France and continental Europe followed suit. By the 19th century coffee was brewed in different devices designed for both home and public Cafés. Adding milk to coffee is mentioned by Europeans already in the 1600s,and sometimes advised. It seems ‘Cappuccino’ originated as the coffee beverage “Kapuziner” in the Viennese coffee houses in the 1700s at the same time as the counterpart “Franziskaner”: ‘Kapuziner’ shows up on Coffee House menus all over the Austro-Hungarian Empire around this time, and is in 1805 described in a Wörterbuch (Dictionairy) as ‘coffee with cream and sugar’ (although it does not say how it is composed). ‘Kapuziner’ is mentioned again in writings in the 1850s, described as ‘coffee with cream, spices and sugar’. Other coffees containing cream surfaces in Vienna, and outside Austria these are referred to as ‘Viennese Coffee’ or ‘Café Viennois’, -coffee with whipped cream-. Predecessors of Irish Coffee, sweetened coffee with different alcohols, topped with whipped cream also spreads out from Vienna.

The ‘Kapuziner’ obviously had its name from the colour of coffee with a few drops of cream, nicknamed so because the capuchin monks in Vienna and elsewhere wore vestments with this colour. Another popular coffee was Franziskaner, with more cream (or milk), referring to the somewhat ‘lighter’ brown colour of the robes of monks of the Franciscan order.

Cappuccino as we write it today is first mentioned in northern Italy in the 1930s, and photographs from that time show a ‘viennese’ —a coffee topped with whipped cream sprinkled with cinnamon or chocolate. The steamed milk atop is a later addition. Though coffee was brewed differently all over Europe after WW2, in Italy, the real espresso machines became widespread only during the 1950s, and ‘cappuccino’ was re-defined, now made from espresso and frothed milk (though far from the quality of steamed milk today). As the espresso machines improved, so did the dosing of coffee and the heating of the milk. Outside Italy, ‘cappuccino’ spread, but was generally made from dark coffee with whipped cream, as it still is in large parts of Europe. The ‘Kapuziner’ remained unchanged on the Austrian coffee menu, even in Trieste, which by 1920 belonged to Italy and in Budapest, Prague, Bratislava and other cities of the former Empire.

Espresso machines were introduced at the beginning of the 20th century, after Luigi Bezzera of Milan filed the first patent in 1901.,and although the first generations of machines certainly did not make espresso the way we define it today, coffee making in Cafés changed in the first decades of the 20th century. These first machines made it possible to serve coffee ‘espresso’ -specifically to each customer. The cups were still the same size, and the dose of beans were ground coarse as before. The too high temperature of the boilers scalded the coffee and several attempts at improving this came in the years after the 1st World War. By the end of the 2nd World War, the Italians launched the ‘age of crèma’ as the new coffee machines could create a higher pressure, leading to a finer grind and the now classic ‘crèma’. The first small cups appear in the 1950s, and the machines could by now also heat milk. The modern ‘cappuccino’ was born. In Vienna, the espresso bars were introduced in the 1950s, leading to both the ‘kapuziner’ and the ‘cappuccino’ being served as two different beverages alongside each other.

In the United Kingdom, espresso coffee initially gained popularity in the form of the cappuccino, influenced by the British custom of drinking coffee with milk, the desire for a longer drink to preserve the café as a destination, and the exotic texture of the beverage.

Spaghetti Carbonara

Spaghetti Carbonara is one of the most popular Italian pasta dishes. This carbonara recipe combines cream, eggs, cheese and bacon.

The traditional Italian version omits the cream, but most people in the states are accustomed to having a bit of cream in their pasta carbonara, so we’re happy to oblige.